Mloukhieh Recipe | From My Kitchen

 

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Mloukhieh is a very popular dish in our region i.e. the Middle East.It is pronounced in more than one way depending on the area you are from. As per Wikipedia, below is the description and some interesting facts about it.

Mulukhiyah, mloukhiya, molokhia, molohiya, mulukhiyya, malukhiyah, or moroheiya (Arabic: ملوخية‎) is the leaves of Corchorus species (Jute leaves) used as a vegetable. It is a popular Middle Eastern and North Africancountries. Mulukhiyyah is rather bitter, and when boiled, the resulting liquid is a thick, highly mucilaginous broth; it is often described as “slimy,” rather like cooked okra. Mulukhiyyah is generally eaten cooked, not raw, and is most frequently turned into a kind of soup or stew, typically bearing the same name as the vegetable in the local language.

The leaves are rich in betacarotene, iron, calcium, Vitamin C and more than 32 vitamins, minerals and trace elements. The plant has a potent antioxidant activity with a significant α-tocopherol equivalent Vitamin E.

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Mloukhieh after being pan fried, frozen, then thawed.

 

Preparation: The Syrian/Lebanese version of this dish is different in texture and preparation. The mulukhiya leaves are picked off the stem, often communally with the women sitting with vast amounts of tall stemmed branches and picking it, placing the leaves on a large sheet (cloth material)left to completely dry for later use. STORAGE The leaves can be later packed dry, some southern Lebanese traditions often freeze the packaged leaves for the season and can be used throughout the year. COOKING The leaves are then fried with coriander, garlic and often RED/GREEN chilly peppers or capsicum, accompanied often with some sort of cucumber pickles. This cooking process prevents them from becoming slimy. It is then boiled with meat, such as large boneless chicken chunks or beef and lamb (with bone). Served on white rice with diced onion and brown vinegar and toasted Arabic bread.

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Simple Sayadieh Recipe (Fish with Rice) | From My Kitchen

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One of my favorite Lebanese/ Arabic dishes is Sayadieh, it is basically a great way to incorporate fish into our diet specially for those who are not big fish fans, aka children. Done in the orthodox way, this is considered one of the elaborate recipes, but being a full time working mom, i won’t deprive my family from such a nutritious meal because of a complex recipe, which is why i simplified it. This is an easy ‘shortcut’ method, so please don’t judge 🙂

for all dishes that have rice within the recipe, it is highly recommended to use long grain rice, known as American rice, or in our region ‘Uncle Bens’.

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Lebanese Moghrabieh Recipe | From My Kitchen

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There are quite a few popular Lebanese dishes that have a reputation of being very difficult to make, which is probably why many people wait to go to their mom’s house to eat them. Moghrabieh is one of them. Moghrabieh looks like a grain or an oversized couscous but  has more of a pasta texture made of Semolina and is  formed into small balls, you can buy a dried version (shown above) or a frozen version and wait for it to thaw. this is the carb part of the dish, the main flavors include Caraway, a spice which has a distinct and refreshing flavor, also used as base for a popular dessert called Mighli.

The other ingredients in my version of the Moghrabieh, include: chicken, preferably thighs, baby onions or shallots, chickpeas (already soaked or canned would be perfect), chicken stock (I make it from the thighs with additional herbs, onion, & garlic). I will walk you through the recipe below and list the ingredients at the end, this way you will be more familiar with the process.

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How To Make Shish Barak (Lebanese meat stuffed dough in Yoghurt sauce)| From My Kitchen

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I don’t recall meeting anyone who doesn’t like shish barak, a thin dough with meat filling in a thick yoghurt sauce. At the beginning of my vacation this year, I found my mom in the kitchen teaching my sister how to make it. I joined them and decided to do this post. The only drawback is that in order to make your life much easier, you will need the tool shown below, otherwise I know personally I would never go through the hassle. The tool is from Syria, so if you know anyone from there you might want to ask them to get you one.

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Ayurvedic Detox Tea Recipe | From My Kitchen

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I posted a video on instagram and really liked it! ( how modest!) but for some reason it wouldn’t work on wordpress.  Anyway, I was watching the Dr.Oz show the other day and they recommended this tea to be sipped warm all day. This improves digestion, removes body toxins, and break down fat. It’s really easy, try it out several times a week, or daily if possible. I had no issues with the taste. Let me know if you try it.

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From My Kitchen | Quinoa The Lebanese Way

Recently I have been trying to add as many healthy foods to my kitchen as possible to try and outdo the damages our bodies face everyday from various sources. Quinoa is a food which has become popular in the past few years but has been considered a superfood for thousands of years, since the time of the Incas. Quinoa is very high in protein, fiber, magnesium, iron, & manganese and must be a staple in every home. Very easy to cook, for every cup of quinoa you require two cups of liquid and just cook till done. Since quinoa has no strong flavor, it absorbs any flavors added to it, which is why I decided to make it similar to the way I cook Bulgar (burghol), a dish my daughter loves.

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From My Kitchen | Easy Halawet Al Jibn | Lebanese Dessert

There is a charm about the month of Ramadan, and for some reason there are dishes people crave only during this holy month. Whether it’s the idea of fasting for a long time or just traditions brought forth across generations, sweets and in particular Arabic sweets are amongst the favorite indulgences in the evening. One of the popular arabic desserts is ” Halawat Al Jibn”, which means ” the sweetness of cheese” is just what the name implies, a dessert based on cheese. This is a household favorite and very popular in Lebanon specially in the Northern part of the country, i.e. in Tripoli.
Instead of waiting to visit Lebanon to try it, why don’t you try this Super Easy method, trust me you won’t regret it. For years we would gather around mom trying to steal bits and pieces of the dough that didn’t make the cut!
This dessert is comprised of 3 parts, the cheese dough, the syrup, and the cream filling ( ashta). For best results have the ashta and syrup prepared before you work on the cheese. Recipe (very easy) for both is found on the Atayef post i posted last year. Link.

From My Kitchen | Low Calorie Crepes

Yep I am a chocoholic, a big fan of warm chocolate in particular,and chocolate crepes happen to be one of my favorite desserts. I have a policy of “prioritizing” calories, in other words I would eat a high calorie meal with the condition that it’s “worth it”. Since I only like crepes filled with Nutella, I thought why not have low calorie crepes to make up for the filling. It’s sort of a compromise, less guilt for me.

This is one of the easiest recipes with only 60 calories per crepe (remember Nutella has around 100 cals per TBS, so you do the math when indulging).

For the crepes you will need:

1 egg

1/2 cup flour

1/4 tsp salt

2/3 cups fat free Milk

Just use a whisk and mix them altogether, try not to have any lumps. As you notice there is no source of fat in this recipe, no oil or butter which is unusual, this is why in addition to using a non-stick pan you will need to use non-stick cooking spray, brand doesn’t matter. Put 1/4 cup of batter in the pan, swirl it around then flip to the other side when done.

You can use any filling you want since you won’t feel guilty eating the crepe itself  😉

Enjoy!